When did you first see Twin Peaks?

General discussion on Twin Peaks not related to the series, film, books, music, photos, or collectors merchandise.

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Jerry Horne
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Postby Jerry Horne » Wed Jan 30, 2008 5:58 pm

TheArm wrote:
Tonya J wrote:Do you think it could have been nervous laughter rather than a callous reaction? People sometimes do that in the face of extreme emotions. I can't imagine someone laughing during Maddy's last moments. It's one of the most horrific things I've ever seen. In fact when I rewatched the whole series a few months back now, my mouth gaped open because I had not remembered how painful it was to watch.


Unfortunately, it was genuine "it's funny!" laughter. I had been showing her the series from the pilot onwards (she was an avid viewer of both Buffy and X-Files, so I thought she had a high level of TP fan potential). I was first concerned when she started laughing during the scene with the One-Armed Man at the end of episode 13, but shrugged it off. But then she started laughing when she saw Julee Cruise in episode 14. And then when Maddy got killed. And then when everyone started crying in the Roadhouse. You would have thought she was watching Fawlty Towers instead of Twin Peaks.

I think she could see I was frustrated as the episode ended and she said something along the lines of "I'm sorry, but it's just so ridiculously over-the-top I can't take it seriously anymore. I mean the singer who is obviously doing a bad lip-sync job and a demon in a denim jacket named Bob of all things and the white horse in the living room? I mean come on...it's supposed to be funny at this point, right?"

In a way, I kinda appreciated what she was saying as I'm guessing that quite a bit of America (not those of us on this board) were probably feeling the same way at this point, and it gave me a good insight into that.


You should have grabbed an axe and smashed the t.v. then turn around, walking towards her and asking her if that was funny?
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Postby Audrey Horne » Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:10 pm

I don't mind people laughing at Sarah's scene. I mind if that's all they see, though -but I've never found that is the case.

Why it works so well because it's just grounded in truth, gutteral and unexpected. Viewers are conditioned for film grief to be delivered in a certain package, and this instead throws off their expectations and takes them out of the comfort zone.

If someone chuckles out of nervousness or even out of the strangeness from what they're used to, then I get it. (Laugh, then followed by an Oh my God, and can't take thier eyes off the screen) They're okay by me.

I can't imagine someone laughing at the Maddy death scene though. My cousin tried to catch the wave and viewed that episode the night it aired, and called me immediately after riveted and terrified, and had to know everything about the show.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby Tonya J » Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:23 pm

I ... ah, .... hmmm. In response, I've being sitting here trying to think if I've ever done such a thing to a friend who wanted to share a television/movie experience with me. I'd like to think if I had the impulse to titter, and not nervously, I would have smothered it somehow until I was alone. I call the nervous impulse the "Chuckles the Clown Syndrome" (based on that famous Mary Tyler Moore episode about Chuckle's funeral) and I have done that, but only at something truly awful, just godawful in fact. But Twin Peaks doesn't deserve that, not even the beauty contest episode.
Leland's daughter was murdered and the Norwegians left.
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april 8, 1990

Postby motoko » Sat Mar 08, 2008 8:22 am

I was 16 at the time and remember leafing through the tv guide that night when my father asked me what I was going to watch that night. I said I was going to give Twin Peaks a try and he replied that he was too. Up till this point, the only exposure I had to David Lynch was Dune (of which I had only caught snippets of off tv, but I remember having liked Kyle). I had recently seen the movie 'The Hidden' with Kyle and had absolutely loved it. I was sixteen, remember.
Anyway, my father and I watched that night and were pretty intrigued. After the dream sequence at the end of episode two, I recall turning to my father and saying something along the lines of, ' What in the hell was that about?' My father just shook his head and I don't believe he ever watched another episode. But my fate took the opposite path. That's when my love affair with all things Lynch began. I loved watching a show and trying to piece together all the clues, and this show really made me think! Not to mention the music, comedy and everything else that was blended so beautifully to make the greatest television show of all time.
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby Tonya J » Wed May 14, 2008 3:37 pm

Can't find a topic specific to Dana and other TP actors' appearances on other television shows.

Saw him in a repeat of a 2007 Law and Order: SVU a couple days ago. How nice to see he's still working because I haven't really kept track of the TP alumnus careers per se. I haven't seen Dana in person since he was a little kid and I have to say he's grown into a very handsome man. Talented goes without saying. I wasn't sure it was him at first because his face has matured, so I looked him up on IMDb and confirmed the episode. Interesting that Sherilyn Fenn also appeared (in a larger role) on SVU back in 2002. If more of them have had roles on any of the three shows, I don't know, but it's an excellent venue for being seen by a wide audience.
Leland's daughter was murdered and the Norwegians left.
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby Brad D » Wed May 14, 2008 9:16 pm

i thought i answered this thread....BUT....

i think my mom was watching the pilot when it re-aired in august of 90. she was totally sucked in, and i noticed so i watched it too. we watched the rest of the episodes and i will never forget how terrified when episodes 8 and 9 aired. i really dont think i was the same for a long time ( i was around 10 years old ). after bob killed maddy my mom made me stop watching the show and i didnt see the rest till 98 when i bought the vhs boxset. it is crazy how thinking about those episodes takes me back to those times.
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby Olivier » Sat Sep 27, 2008 8:09 am

I saw Twin Peaks for the first time in 1991, when it was broadcast on Silvio Berlusconi's short-lived French "La Cinq" channel-- a great channel, with lots of good movies and '80's TV series.
I was just out of high school and starting college.

I did not see the pilot episode; I faintly remember missing the first episode, but that they ran it again.
Anyway, I loved what I saw. I am pretty sure I knew The Elephant Man, but Lynch's name was not really familiar to me yet.

My mother later bought the whole British VHS set (in 1992?), but after viewing it once, we took it back and got a refund because the video quality was really poorer than on TV.
Thus, all I had for about ten years was the British tape of the pilot episode, whose quality was better; I was dumbfounded by the international ending, which did not even make much sense on its own.
I also got the Welcome to Twin Peaks guide, and The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, plus Angelo Badalamenti's Twin Peaks CD-- I love film music, and his main theme is sumptuous; it is a great score, and the songs are superb.
A friend copied me the Dale Cooper tape, but I cannot find it-- darn.
The one thing missing in my Twin Peaks experience is Fire Walk With Me, which I have yet to see.

I was not interested in getting a LaserDisc player because it was too expensive and I thought it could use some improving-- those LP-like discs were cumbersome and could not even hold a regular movie on one side; I was confident they could improve on this drastically.

I purchased Artisan's Season 1 set as soon as it was available, then waited eagerly for the rest of the series to be released, and at long last, got it all with the Gold set.

As mentioned in another topic, due to various reasons and unfortunate circumstances, I had to wait till now to watch it; I am currently watching it every evening, three episodes at a time. I also listened to the commentaries on the very first set; it's a pity there are not any on the new set, it was very interesting.
Of course, I also bought the second CD.

It has thus been a good 15-16 years since I last saw the second season, which means I am pretty much rediscovering it all, though I do remember certain facts and scenes very well.
In fact, before taking the VHS set back to the store, I watched some scenes again, and transcribed some bits of dialogue, such as Laura's killer's speech in the cell.
I don't remember how Audrey's adventures at One-Eyed Jack's end, however; important as this is, I have somewhat forgotten.

It's good to be back in Twin Peaks-- and to be able to experience it all over a short, mostly uninterrupted period (only one episode of N.C.I.S. and two of C.S.I. to watch on Fridays and Sundays before watching some Twin Peaks).
It is as excellent as way back then-- even more so, since I can now appreciate all the subtleties better, and thus appreciate even more how unique Twin Peaks is, and the high quality of every component (narrative, casting, acting, music, ...).

What a shame Lynch & Frost could not develop it the way they intended, over a longer period, and that it ended in such a way (at the time, I hoped in vain for another season, another few episodes to wrap it up all and make things right again)!

It's not just even a matter of Frost & Lynch being too much in advance on their time; I don't think they would stand a better chance nowadays: Mulholland Drive was rejected as a pilot for a new series and had to be made into a movie, and the poor way so many people react to Lost's unconventional story and blend of genre (from a straightforward Robinson Crusoe/Swiss Family to fantasy to science fiction), storytelling (flashbacks & flashforwards, a blurring of good and evil) and long developing arc (mysteries within mysteries, discoveries and answers opening up onto yet more questions and riddles-- precisely like Twin Peaks) show (too) many people still cannot accept anything relatively complex that requires some attention and thinking, that strays too far from the clearly delineated genres and storylines, upsets them ever so slightly, and rejects the "slam! bang!" approach of having rapid fire so-called one-liners every minute (if possible, emphasized by a laugh track), two storylines per episode at the utmost, and, above all, a complete resolution at the end of the episode.

Such stories/series as Twin Peaks require much involvement on the viewer's part, and and it's way to much for many: the fantastic elements baffle people because they are presented in a very Lynchian way (no systematic, clear explanation; high stylization); you need Cooper's open-mindedness to accept and embrace this quirky universe and its odd characters; more than suspension of disbelief, a certain mindset is required, to let yourself be immersed in all this weirdness, to float along and absorb it all; and of course, you have to be able to keep focused on something more than five seconds in order to relish the slow rhythm, the carefully, leisurelly paced storytelling and filming, the quiet, dreamy, melancholy music, and the moody shots and scenes.

God bless David Lynch & Mark Frost, the writers & directors, the actors & the crew, and Angelo Badalamenti, for creating such an excellent series, such a wonderful and unique experience, as Twin Peaks!
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby adammunkay » Sun Sep 28, 2008 6:59 pm

I remember when the pilot came on and do think I watched with my Mom cause I remembered the paper under Laura's fingernail and that was it. Fast forward to 2008. Over the years alot of my friends told me this was a show I would enjoy and needed to watch. In the movie department I like some weird things and I knew of Lynch from Blue Velvet, Lost Highway, and The Elephant Man. The first time I saw the Elephant Man I cired cause me and my Mom watched it together and if she cries I cry. So I downloaded the first season of Twin Peaks on my laptop and watched the whole thing 3 times in one week. I was hooked. Then I got my hands on the Twin Peaks Gold box set on day when I was out at the local Mall. Best Money I have ever spent. I could go on and on about how great this show is but you folks already know that. The thing I think that makes it so haunting for me is Angelo's music. Without the music I dont know if it would be as great a series that it is. So through the years of people telling me to watch I dont know why I didnt sooner. I have had Twin Peaks all around me for years and didnt even know it, mostley in music. I guess you could call me a rocker type of dude but I had no idea how many songs people had used samples from the show in. The Moby Song "Go" especially. And lastley and I dont know why but the scene in the series that just puts an indecribable feeling over me is in the last episode. When Andy is asking Sheriff Truman if he want a themos of coffee and a plate special and desert. I dont know why but I always felt like that was a great scene. I think it really shows how loving a caring Andy really is. It just hits me in the chest like a ton of bricks everytime. So there is my Twin Peaks story. Thanks to those of you who read it and thanks for having me here at dugpa.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_Qwo8sT9U0
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby human germ » Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:25 am

i believe that it was 1st run during the summer of 90 here in western mass; i didn't bother with it then. but when it was rerun in the fall, i watched the pilot and was instantly hoooked. i did miss some of the episodes of the 2nd season, so i bought the full vhs set soon after they were released. 70 odd bux. whew. then i'd bought the dvd sets for both seasons many years later. much less $$ and far better quality.
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby human germ » Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:14 pm

i just wanted to add my 2 cents to the discussion regarding laura's mother. i have to admit, that i, too, laughed when she screamed and sobbed upon learning of her daughter's murder, because of the manner in which she expressed her grief. it was over the top and funny as hell. that character always struck me funny.
yet, the scene in episode 16 when agent cooper comfort leland was very moving. the unleashed sprinklers added greatly to the whole effect. i found that footage to be amazing.

oh yeah and
I was first concerned when she started laughing during the scene with the One-Armed Man at the end of episode 13
. well, i laughed, too, as the one armed man's voice sounded so funny when he'd said 'mom'...but i think that may well be in an earlier episode in season 1. i think given lynch's penchance for off the wall humor, that many 'serious' scenes in TP may have been inspired by that very quirkyness and may well have been funny to him, anyway.

but why would someone laugh at julee cruise? damn, but her music is gorgeous and compelling. as well as her retro style. loved loved loved it!!
done bun; can't be undone
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby NoiselessFan » Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:21 am

Watched all eps for the first time over the past 6 days
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby Hauntingdream » Sat Oct 24, 2009 12:03 pm

I saw it in 1991 when it first aired in The Netherlands and it totally mesmerized me. I was 14 at the time and nothing had ever consumed me as much as Twin Peaks.

I recently bought the Gold edition and am totally back at it. Feeling 14 again, but understanding a lot of the underlying issues that I didn't pick up the first time. Oh experience and age :-)
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby Mb3 » Tue Dec 01, 2009 9:01 pm

I'm not quite sure when the show was aired for the first time over here, probably around 91. Anyway back then I was 11 or maybe 12 years old and I can remember that I thought when I saw it on Tv that it was just another one of these simple soap operas. Unfortunately that false impresssion that I had of the show remained in my mind until I finally took the time to watch the whole show for the first time about two years ago. After watching it I also was converted into a fan of this wonderfull series probably one of the greatest Tv series that were ever made.
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby ProfessorRiffs » Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:03 pm

About 4 years ago. I had been obsessed with Julee Cruise's Peaks-related albums since about 2000, but never knew they contained music from a show. I'm just not a TV guy. Then one day I was talking with a friend about music, and Julee came up. When it was revealed that I didn't know the music was from Twin Peaks, let alone that I had never seen it, he instantly loaned me the pilot and season 1. I watched the pilot and, by the time the opening credits were done, I knew I was going to be hooked. I still am.
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Re: When did you first see Twin Peaks?

Postby Black Rose » Fri Dec 11, 2009 11:42 pm

I first saw it during the second run of the first season. I was about 12 at the time.

I think it's one of the few things I have been exposed to that was really DARK. Like, REALLY DARK.

I am glad that I saw it at that time in my life, because it taught me a lot, and I can see now how deeply it has shaped my worldview.

I could talk about the trivial things, like how my dog is named Maddy, and how I have red drapes in my room, and how I feel a deeper connection with owls than I would have felt before (and as a dedicated owler, this is saying something), but the fact of the matter is that the show changed my perspective on many things, and it did so in a way that I cannot succinctly quantify. I suppose that the show taught me about beauty and horror in a way that I would not understand if I had not seen it.

I am still disappointed that I did not grow up to be Audrey. :(

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